Putting Ourselves in Learners’ Shoes

Teaching others is a great way to learn.

When training others or delegating a task, one of the hardest things to do is presenting the information in a way the person understands.  Sometimes we think of this as “explain it as you would to a 5 year old.”  It really boils down to putting ourselves in the position of a beginner when we are the expert.

This article delves into this topic nicely.  While it focuses on college professors, it really applies to anyone is I the position to help others acquire new knowledge, skills, or abilities.  Putting the educators in an uncomfortable position of learning something new really served as a reminder of how difficult it can be to pick up on something you don’t know.

While it’s not necessarily practical to have managers and trainers master a difficult puzzle in order for them to empathize with others who are learning, there are some actions that help put them in a better position to do so, including:

  1. Make sure there is good two-way communication during the learning process.  When delegating a task, a manager should ask the delegate to describe what is being asked of her/him/them in order to demonstrate understanding.
  2. Explain things to people in multiple ways. This leads us to think about tasks in more than one way (e.g., only the way we think is best) so that it’s understandable to a wider audience.
  3. Be patient with the learner as he/she/they attempts the task.  All of us learn through both success and failure.  You need to let both of them happen and that takes time.

We all learned what we do in our work with sometimes good, and sometimes not so good, teachers.  Our effectiveness in delegating or teaching tasks partially lies in putting ourselves in the position of the learner rather than the expert.  By thinking of ways to do that, we’ll be more effective in improving the skill levels in our organizations.

Hiring For and Developing Resilience

I frequently hear clients talk about how they need to hire people who are resilient.  When I press them on what that means to them, they come up with words and phrases like:

Bends, but doesn’t break.

Learns from adversity

Performs well under stress

Doesn’t take work setbacks personally

These things are all true and part of the personality trait Emotional Stability, which can be a good predictor for some jobs.  But the aspect of resilience which gets overlooked, but can be equally important for employee selection and development, is sociability.  While the stereotype of the resilient person as one who swallows his/her/their emotions and hunkers down, there is scientific evidence that we build resilience when we reach out to, and accept help from, others.

This is useful in selection in that it can alter the types of tests that we give and what we look for in responses to interview questions.  For instance, when asking, “Tell me about when you had to meet a tight deadline,” an answer like, “I reached out to my team and asked how they could help” shows more resilience than, “I put everything aside and worked by myself until I completed the assignment.”  This additional dimension is useful in interpreting validated personality tests as we can then look for people who score high on Emotional Stability and willingness to work with others.

For development, we can teach people the power of reaching out to others during difficult times.  For managers, this means offering assistance to those who are struggling rather than waiting for them to pull themselves up by the bootstraps.  For individual contributors, this requires a message that reaching out to others when you need help builds resistance and is not a sign of weakness.  Of course, these messages require reinforcement by senior management so that they become part of the culture.

To see if resilience is a key part of jobs at your company, you can do the following:

  1. Conduct a job analysis.  Whether you use surveys or interviews, you can gather data about how much stress or pressure feel people feel in their jobs.
  2. Find out what effective resilience looks like.  During the job analysis, have people describe critical incidents where resilience was (and wasn’t) shown.

This data can be used for selecting future hires by:

  1. Sourcing a validated and reliable instrument that measures Emotional Stability and willingness to communicate with others (and other tests which measure important aspects of the work as found in your job analysis). 
  2. Administering the test(s) to incumbents.
  3. Gathering measures of how participants are performing on the job, including resilience.
  4. Analyzing the data to see if the measures of Emotional Stability and communication are correlated with measures of resilience and/or performance.
  5. Using the results to screen future candidates.

The job analysis data can be used for developing employees by:

  1. Sourcing or designing training materials that address the critical incidents described in the job analysis.  The more behavior/role playing in the training, the better.
  2. Gathering measures of how participants are performing on the job, including resilience.
  3. Conducting the training and gather feedback from participants.
  4. Measuring performance, including resilience, after enough time to see the impact of the training.
  5. Making adjustments to the training material based on the feedback and performance data.

Note that in each case you are seeking to demonstrate the impact of improving resilience in your organization. Just as importantly, you are establishing its importance in the company and taking steps to weave it into your culture.

Managing WFH Scheduling Changes

As COVID cases are dropping and the vaccines are available, companies are looking to see when (if?) they are going to bring people back to offices.  There are likely to be all kinds of flavors of this, ranging from:

  1. We want everybody back, Monday through Friday.
  2. We need some people back full time, others can still WFH.
  3. Everyone needs to be in the office 2-3 times a week and WFH the rest.
  4. Everyone can stay WFH, but those who prefer to come in can.
  5. Everyone stays WFH


And these don’t include flexible hours, people staying part-time, etc.  There are going to be a LOT of models.  There is no one best way for every company, but there are some consistent steps you will want to consider as you manage work schedules changes (again). These include:

  1. Consider ALL of your stakeholders.  This means listening not just to executives who feel that people are more productive at the office or the employees who feel that they are missing out on promotional opportunities by working from home.  Be sure that your support staff (HR, IT, security, etc.) is also in a position to support those who are coming back (or staying home).
  2. Be clear to everyone about your reasons for the schedule changes.  If you have data that supports that teams are more productive in the office, then share it.  If you have data that shows that people are still getting promoted at the same rate during WFH, share that, too. And don’t forget health department data on infections, positivity rates, etc. Use good information, rather than anecdotes, drive your decisions and communicate about the data.
  3. Track metrics of success and adjust the schedules as necessary.  Whether it is what was mentioned above, rate of infections, use of PTO, turnover, absenteeism, or something else, have conversations about what success looks like.  Then measure progress towards it.  The data may allow you to accelerate your plans or alter them in some other way.
  4. Check in with your stakeholders as the revised policies are implemented.  Sometimes we think that people who initially support change will always be in favor of it and those who are resistant stay that way. Keep asking stakeholders what they need to continue to support, or to become supportive, of the changes.
  5. Communicate the metrics.  Whether it’s through an online dashboard or a regular e-mail, keep people apprised of progress (or lack thereof).  Transparency helps to control the rumor mill and provides reasons for altering the initial plan.

Going back to “normal” requires the same level of change management skill as implementing something different.  Be sure that you apply these techniques to help implement and manage schedule changes as you navigate through COVID.

Going back to “normal” work schedules is going to take as much change management skills as WFH did.  Here are some thoughts on implementing the new normal more effectively.

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