Just Give Job Seekers the Information They Need

I’ve written in the past about ensuring that job postings are free from potential discrimination. But, summer is also the time when we think about internships and attracting early career talent. No, this is not going to be a screed about millennials and their work ethic. Rather, I will ask you to consider whether your job postings are appealing to them.

This article encourages employers to be direct, rather than using jargon in their postings. More importantly, and in contrast with the stereotype that younger workers are looking for things that are flashy, the more effective ads had basic information. Apparently, listing things like salary ranges, location, and the company’s mission is important. Who knew?

What is effective in marketing, which is what job postings really are, changes regularly. So, what works now may not work in 12 months. Fortunately, this is a data-rich environment, so there are things you can do to measure the success of your postings:

1) Experiment with language and see which versions attract more interest.

2) Get input from recent hires on the content of the ads. This will help keep you current as to what job seekers in a specific demographic are looking for.

3) Your ATS probably does keyword searches on resumes and your social media likely relies on keywords, perhaps those same ones, to show up in better places on the web. Measure whether those keywords are attracting the people you want to reach.

The message here is really not to get overly cute or overthink job postings for entry level positions or internships. If you are direct and provide the job seeker what s/he is looking for, you are likely to attract more interest.

Higher Minimum Wages and Success in the Hospitality Industry

The state of California and several of its cities have been on the forefront of raising the minimum wage.  The arguments for (people cannot live on the current minimum wage) and against (it will cost jobs because business will need to lay people off) it are familiar.  But now there is some data that makes a very interesting link between quality and the impact of raising wages.

This study looks at the impact of raises in the minimum wage and restaurant employment in the San Francisco Bay Area.  Don’t be fooled by the academic nature of the paper—the authors do a good job of explaining things in English before digging into the math (though you can get another explanation here with an eye towards the political).  The main takeaway from the article is that well run restaurants (in this case, defined by high Yelp ratings) are not impacted by minimum wage hikes.  Crappy restaurants (based on quality, not menu price) saw their already higher closure rate go up with the increases.  So, what does this mean for HR?

  • Well run businesses can absorb higher wages when their competitors cannot. This may mean higher prices (in some instances people will pay for quality) or that these businesses can survive on lower profit margins.  HR can contribute to this through good hiring (brining in people who can deliver high levels of customer service) and training (developing a learning culture) practices.
  • Use data to improve quality. The study shows that online feedback (in this case, Yelp reviews) is strongly correlated with business success.  This customer input should be used to improve service and quality.
  • If we presume that the vast majority of the workers at the restaurants are at minimum wage (as the paper does), this research tells us that paying more is not an indicator of quality or success. If restaurant A is getting a rating of 5 and restaurant B is getting a rating of 3, it is not due to wage differentials.  Rather, it is likely based on the quality of the product and the level of service.  HR may not have much impact on the former, but it certainly does on the latter.

What the paper really tells is that that business can succeed without necessarily being the one that pays the highest wages.  When wages are held constant, hiring the best people from the available labor pool may lead to higher service delivery.  This, in addition to a good product, can keep a business successful, even if wages are forced to go up.

When Even Tech Job Training Lags Behind Need

In any employment market there are going to be jobs in high demand and those that go unfilled.  In our tech driven economy, the jobs that are hard to recruit for range from utility lineman (long hours, hard work, and fabulous pay) and, strangely enough, cyber security.  With all of the hype and news around hacking, I was surprised to learn that these $80k/year jobs are readily available.  But why?

From a selection standpoint, good cyber security engineers need an odd combination of skills.  Of course they need to be great programmers with high levels of critical thinking.  However, they often need to have a criminal’s mindset (“How would I get into this system without someone knowing?”), which makes them a risky hire given their access to sensitive data.  And makes them attractive on the black market.

The incentives for prevention jobs are also difficult.  After all, they are performing well when nothing goes wrong.  But, when someone breaks into the system…

This is an opportunity for industry and universities to work together.  College students want tech jobs (sorry to those of you who recruit linemen), but they tend to want to work in the sexier product/app development area. Tech companies can show higher education how to make the field more “fun,” perhaps through gamification and appealing to the cat-and-mouse aspect of the work.

My sense is that they pay for these jobs will also need to rise to fill them.  If it is true that good cyber security engineers have good hacking skills, there needs to be a sense of doing the right thing pays at least almost as well as breaking into systems.

What we see is that even tech companies need to be thinking about how to get future workers trained and recruited for jobs that are not that appealing.  As our economy constantly evolves, companies will still need “legacy” employees (yes, some day, app development will be boring compared to what is hot then).  And it is possible that the cycle of job obsolescence will become shorter.  This makes the challenge for schools to provide the skills to future employees even greater.  Industry and education will both benefit if they work together in that venture.  I just hope in the meantime no one has hacked my blog.

Recruiting and Customers

When a consumer brand, especially a national one, looks for new hires, they are doing more than acquiring talent. They are making an impression on their customer base as much as any other piece of advertising.  That in and of itself is not a revelation (or, at least it shouldn’t be).  Rather, consider how much that information has been used in designing recruiting tools or assessments.

This is important because some of these companies will come in contact with a million or more potential candidates and customers.  While HR may loathe the idea of working with marketing (data vs. feelings) on recruitment and selection, there are some inherent advantages, including:

  1. Using language that will attract the target audience.  The marketing department probably knows more about reaching those who are attracted to the company than HR does. This can increase the effectiveness or your recruitment outreach.
  2. Making Awesome Realistic Job Previews.  At the risk of over-generalizing, most HR departments are much better at describing a job than getting people excited about one.  Sure, an RJP should discourage those who would not be a good fit, but it should also grab the attention of those who maybe would not have considered the job to increase the talent pool from which you are drawing. A marketing perspective is likely to help design RJPs to attract job seekers.
  3. Following-up With Non-Selected Candidates.  Let’s face it, you are likely to reject more candidates than you hire.  Not following up with them hurts your brand. And you want to keep them as (potential) customers, right?  Marketing can likely help you craft messages in a way that leave the person with a positive feeling about the brand so that they will become customers (or stay that way).

 

HR has an important job to do when recruiting and selecting talent.  Yet, it should be mindful that its messaging can have as much impact on customers as anything that comes out of the marketing department.  Reaching across departments can add some expertise that will make recruitment and selection more effective.  And, who knows, maybe they will ask for your advice in the future.

Putting Tech Diversity Puzzle Pieces Together

I am going to write about an issue with political ramifications while doing my best not to be political, so please accept these thoughts in that light.

One thread going through the proposed ban on legal immigration to the U.S. is the effect it will have on the tech industry.  Those companies are concerned that some of the talent they need from other countries will be unable to either enter the U.S. on an H-1 visa or be allowed to immigrate here.

Another issue that the tech industry has struggled with is hiring a diverse workforce in the U.S.  Much has been made of the lack of women and (domestic) minorities in the tech field.

However, there are more programs to teach tech skills to minorities and girls than you can shake a stick at.  A Google search of “minority tech training” garnered almost 18 million hits and “girls tech training” got 198 million. So, there is not a shortage of opportunities to obtain coding or other tech skills in the U.S. and these programs have created a pipeline of talent.  Likewise, there are specific tech incubator programs for women and minorities who want to start their own companies.

Why is all of this important?  Primarily because for a company to be innovative it needs to look at the world through a window and not a straw.  There are more tech users outside of the U.S. than inside, so to be successful internationally companies need foreign talent.  Shutting our borders and wanting our companies to compete overseas is a difficult problem to solve.  Women and minorities outnumber white males in the U.S., so the companies that harness those perspectives are likely to be the most successful ones.

So, what might be the barriers to connecting talent to opportunity?

  • Hiring like us. I’ve written before about the built in bias we all have of wanting to be with others who have a similar background.  This is very prevalent when it comes to which schools the person attended, which sports s/he played, etc.  This can be alleviated by:
    1. Removing names from resumes.
    2. Removing schools and extra-curricular activities from resumes, unless you have data supporting their use (and the literature on the validity of training and experience measures is not encouraging).
    3. Recruiting where you have never recruited before. For instance, go to schools that are not currently represented in your workforce.
  • Candidates being unfamiliar with the hiring process. In our bubbles we think that every step of the hiring process is normal.  But, to use a tech example, if I come from an area without many tech companies, I might not be familiar with “whiteboarding” code problems as part of an interview.  Being transparent about the steps and letting people know what to expect removes a potential barrier between you and a qualified candidate.
  • Hiring processes that invite bias. Whether it is how you score your interviews or evaluate resumes, having an evaluation rubric will reduce bias.
  • Echo chambers on interview panels. Have diverse points of view (e.g., people from different departments) on your interview panel.  This is likely to encourage meaningful follow-up questions, even within a structured interview.

I do not think that lowering standards is an appropriate response to creating a more diverse and innovative workforce.  Building walls (metaphorical or otherwise) makes the problem worse.  Rather, companies need to build more bridges to find qualified candidates to bring different perspectives to their organizations.  Yeah, I get that it is more work, but a competitive marketplace demands it.

What Implicit Bias Looks Like

The idea of implicit bias has been making its way into the business vernacular.  It involves the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner.  As you probably gathered from the definition, implicit bias is something we all have.  They are little mental shortcuts we have which can lead to discriminatory behavior.

Examples of implicit bias are found throughout the hiring process, including recruiting, interviews, and performance appraisals.  I think that you will find this interview very helpful in understanding how these biases creep into our decision making. 

It really breaks down the abstract to the actual behaviors and their impacts.

At this point of the blog is where I normally come up with a prescription of what to do.  The only problem is that there are no good empirical studies showing how to reduce implicit bias.  There are some lab studies with college students which support some short-term effectiveness, but some police departments swear that they are a waste of time.  So, the jury is still out.  But, there are some things you can do to reduce the opportunity for bias:

  • You can (mostly) decode gender out of job postings.
  • Take names off of applications before they are sent for review. The law requires that race, gender, and age information be optional on applications to help avoid discrimination.  For the same reason, you should redact names on applications and resumes before they are evaluated (if they are not already being machine scored).
  • If you are using pre-employment tests that do not have adverse impact, weight them more than your interviews, which are likely loaded with bias. If you insist on putting final decisions in the hands of interviewers, use a very structured process (pre-written questions, detailed scoring rubrics, etc.).

All humans have implicit biases—we want to be surrounded by our in-group.  A reduction in these biases, or at least fewer opportunities to express them, will likely lead you to a more diverse, and better performing, team.

Really, Autonomy is NOT Overrated

To use a tired cliché, they call it Show Business for a reason. Fortunately, within the last 10 years or so, the news media in Los Angeles has been covering that industry as it would any other large one in the region. So, it made a local splash when the Chairman and CEO of CBS said at a conference when discussing the artistic freedom that streaming services and others give filmmakers, “Autonomy is overrated” and “I helped cast ‘Friends.’ I was an executive… We help the process at the studio, at the network.”

I think there are better ways to support your argument than a one-off example from 20+ years ago. Also, Mlodinow’s book The Drunkard’s Walk cites some pretty good examples how much randomness goes into the success of entertainment ventures, so for each positive example he provided for casting I’m sure there is another one where his control over the decision making process hurt the project. Or, maybe the show would have been just as successful with the original casting. But, I digress.

Autonomy is freedom from external control or influence. It does not mean doing something without input or ideas from others. It is a state of independence in that you have the final say on decisions. Perhaps from an executive’s point of view that’s dangerous or nerve wracking, but for employees it is anything but overrated. The data show that perceived autonomy is related to many important organizational outcomes, including productivity and job satisfaction.

What he was really talking about was his company’s willingness to invest $X million of dollars into anything without having some veto rights in terms of content, casting, etc. In this case, it’s buying content and the struggle is over who really owns it. In a more typical scenario, it’s hiring people to execute a business plan and the struggle is over how much control the managers feel they needs to have over employees.

This week I’m working with a retail client in building competency models. They have recently moved to a business model where customer engagement is more important than it had been in the past. One example that middle managers gave of this was getting rid of a multi-tiered refund policy (this happens if you have a receipt, this happens if it’s after 30 days, etc.) and giving the store managers the decision making authority to say “Yes” to pretty much any reasonable refund request. I’m guessing that customers don’t think that this autonomy is overrated.

Autonomy is also a key part of the “gig” economy. While there are important legal issues as to whether these people are employees in certain situations, the larger issue is that there’s a strong need for them to feel that they are controlling their own destiny. A few months ago I got a ride from a woman who was living the gig economy dream. She had a “regular” part-time job where she had control of her hours. She drove for two ride sharing services and rented out a room in her house. When I asked her if that was a lot to keep track of, she responded that she was a good time manager (obviously) and that the freedom to work (or not work) any specific set of hours was important to her.

My observation is that millennials enjoy the autonomy that technology gives them. This leads to an expectation of it in the workplace. Employers should use this as an opportunity to create engagement.

Giving people (appropriate) decision making authority should not be scary if they are properly hired and trained. Executives who fear autonomy are missing out on engaged and high performing employees.

When More is Worse

In every organization you need to strike a balance between implementing good processes and getting things done quickly.  In that sense, recruitment and selection are no different than any other logistics activity.

This article has some one person’s opinions and insights and into problems the U.N. has in how they hire and manage people (among other things).  Obviously, the U.N. has special challenges in terms of security, but an average 213 days to recruit someone for any job is ridiculous.  And, remember, half of the positions take longer.  One can only imagine the use of the same process to hire a grant manager, administrative assistant, and field doctor.
download kingroot apk

All hiring is a risk analysis.  What are the odds that this person will work out (not that you can improve them with validation selection tools)?  Call centers and retail always have to balance opportunity costs of having an open position rather than filing it will a less than ideal candidate.

Another issue is the long term cost of having an underperforming employee.  Many organizations, apparently including the UN, do such a poor job of performance management that a bad hire is expensive for a long time.  Again, a case of far too much process getting in the way of achieving organizational performance.

But, things can change.  GE has made a big bet on data.  So much that they are getting out of some of their traditional businesses to focus on it.  What I liked about this article was how they worked from business need (how can we recruit more software engineers?) to their HR processes (OK, we’ll make this change so we can attract more).  Of course, they’re a big company with big legacy processes and I’m sure the article makes it sound a lot easier than it was.  But, they are making it happen.

For more information on making your HR process work for you, contact Warren Bobrow.

Blind Hiring

I wrote a few weeks ago about Intel’s drive to diversify its workforce. Regular readers know that I write about bias occasionally. It’s good that the topic makes it to the mainstream media occasionally when not related to a lawsuit.

The article talks about techniques to reduce bias. Some are old (truly blind auditions for musicians) and other are new, such as software that provides only the relevant hiring info without showing a person’s name, school attended, or other information that would potentially bias the hiring manager. This puts a premium on validated tests, which I like. Though, I’m sure that there are some readers who would argue that some of these tests are biased as well, but that’s a topic for another post.

This is all well and good, but as any logistics or customer service person will tell you, it’s the last mile that really matters. I can have as diverse of a candidate pool as I want, but if there is bias in the interviewing process, I will be rejecting qualified candidates for non-valid reasons. So, what’s a hiring manager to do?

First, give less weight to the interview and/or make it more valid. Why this barely better than a coin-flip technique makes or breaks a hiring decision when proven and validated techniques are shoved the side is beyond me. OK—I get it. People want to feel in control and have buy-in to the hiring process. But, can we at least be more rational about it? Interview scores should be combined with other data (with appropriate weighting) and the overall score should be used to make hiring decisions, not the one unreliable data point.

Second, why not blind interviewing? Hear me out. How many jobs really require someone to think on their feet and provide oral answers to complex questions? Sure, there are some (sales, for instance), but not that many. Why not have candidates submit written answers to interview questions? The scoring would be more reliable (evaluating grammar/spelling could be optional for jobs where it’s not critical), and accents, gender, and skin color would be taken out of the equation. Think about it.

Lastly, a diverse workforce is a result of a valid and inclusive selection process. When companies approach it the other way (working backwards from hiring goals by demographic group), they miss the point. Diversity isn’t about filling buckets. It’s about providing equal opportunity every step of the way when hiring.

For more information on valid pre-employment testing hiring practices, contact Warren Bobrow.

A Crazy Way To Test Candidates

You think you have it bad when hiring. Imagine if:

  • All of your entry level job candidates were known to your entire industry and customers.
  • You and all of your competitors had access to exactly the same background, pre-employment, and past performance data, outside of your one chance to interview this person.
  • Oh, and at least one of the pre-employment tests that are given doesn’t correlate with the performance of your most critical employees.
  • The cost of acquiring the labor is huge and the compensation levels are fixed.
  • If you make a mistake, it takes a year to correct.
  • It may be 3 years before you know if you made a good hire.
  • The order of when you and your competitors can make a job offer is pre-determined, though for a high price you can jump the line.
  • And this all takes place on national television in front of your customers.

Welcome to the drafting of professional sports players in the United States. And this time of the year, the focus is on the National Football League (NFL).

I bring this up because the NFL brings nearly all of the prospective players to a group workout called a combine, which leads to the drafting of players in April. In the combine, the players are prodded and poked by medical staffs, given psychological tests, and are put through a variety of physical skill exercises. Teams also have a chance to interview players individually. The combine is organized so that the teams can see what the roughly 300 players can do without flying them all over the country. For players’ perspectives on this and the drafting process, click here and here.

 

The oddest thing about the combine is that they take single measurements of core skills (speed, jumping ability, etc) when they have access to recordings of every single play in which the player has participated (real performance). Granted, different players go against different levels of competition, but you would think that about 1000 samples of a person’s performance would be a bit of a better indicator than how fast he covers 40 yards (usually a touch under 5 seconds, even for the big guys). The interviews can be all over the map with clubs asking about drinking behavior (the players are college students) and the ability to breakdown plays. And then many players get picked by teams that don’t interview them at all.

From a validation point of view, the performance data on players are actually readily available now. Much like call centers, the NFL records some very detailed individual statistics and not just team wins and losses to evaluate players. Whether the number of times a defensive lineman can bench press 225 lbs correlates with tackles for loss is not known (or at least published), but you get the idea.

Much is made about the pressure that the players are under to perform well at the combine. This is probably more so for those from smaller schools or with whom the teams are less familiar. But, the pressure is also really on the talent scouts (sports’ version of recruiters). They only get to pick 7 players in the draft. Undrafted players can be signed by any team and history shows that they have a surprisingly high success rate (see below).

Because of the amount of data available on players, the draft process is reasonably efficient, if you use the metrics of percentage of players who are in the starting lineup on rosters by draft position, turnover (which is mostly involuntary, and achieving high performance (measured by being voted onto the all-start team), higher drafter players do better than lower drafted ones. Of course, the higher a player is taken in the draft, the more he’s paid for the first part of his career, so there is some financial bias to start higher drafted players. Interestingly, undrafted players perform at the same level on these metrics as third round picks. Perhaps there’s something to having a chip on your shoulder.

What we can learn from the NFL is that when there’s a lot of data available, you can make better selection decisions, even when your competitors have the same data. Second, there’s still plenty of good (though not the best) talent available that’s overlooked by the masses. Finding that inefficiency in the selection process and addressing it can lead to a significant competitive advantage. A good validation process can help you do that.

For more thoughts and insights regarding pre-employment test validation, contact Warren Bobrow.

Thanks for coming by!

Please provide this information so we can stay in touch.

CLOSE